Daryle Lockhart

theatlantic:

Why the LBJ of 1964 Wouldn’t Succeed In Washington Today

The LBJ Library recently held a multiday program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, and by all accounts, the program was stirring and stimulating, up to and including President Obama’s speech.
But there was one downside: the reactivation of one of the most enduring memes and myths about the presidency, and especially the Obama presidency. Like Rasputin (or Whac-A-Mole,) it keeps coming back even after it has been bludgeoned and obliterated by facts and logic. I feel compelled to whack this mole once more.
The meme is what Matthew Yglesias, writing in 2006, referred to as "the Green Lantern Theory of Geopolitics," and has been refined by Greg Sargent and Brendan Nyhan into the Green Lantern Theory of the presidency. In a nutshell, it attributes heroic powers to a president—if only he would use them. And the holders of this theory have turned it into the meme that if only Obama used his power of persuasion, he could have the kind of success that LBJ enjoyed with the Great Society, that Bill Clinton enjoyed in his alliance with Newt Gingrich that gave us welfare reform and fiscal success, that Ronald Reagan had with Dan Rostenkowski and Bill Bradley to get tax reform, and so on.
If only Obama had dealt with Congress the way LBJ did—persuading, cajoling, threatening, and sweet-talking members to attain his goals—his presidency would not be on the ropes and he would be a hero. If only Obama would schmooze with lawmakers the way Bill Clinton did, he would have much greater success. If only Obama would work with Republicans and not try to steamroll them, he could be a hero and have a fiscal deal that would solve the long-term debt problem.
If only the proponents of this theory would step back and look at the realities of all these presidencies (or would read or reread the Richard Neustadt classic, Presidential Power.)
Read more. [Image: JD Hancock/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Why the LBJ of 1964 Wouldn’t Succeed In Washington Today

The LBJ Library recently held a multiday program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, and by all accounts, the program was stirring and stimulating, up to and including President Obama’s speech.

But there was one downside: the reactivation of one of the most enduring memes and myths about the presidency, and especially the Obama presidency. Like Rasputin (or Whac-A-Mole,) it keeps coming back even after it has been bludgeoned and obliterated by facts and logic. I feel compelled to whack this mole once more.

The meme is what Matthew Yglesias, writing in 2006, referred to as "the Green Lantern Theory of Geopolitics," and has been refined by Greg Sargent and Brendan Nyhan into the Green Lantern Theory of the presidency. In a nutshell, it attributes heroic powers to a president—if only he would use them. And the holders of this theory have turned it into the meme that if only Obama used his power of persuasion, he could have the kind of success that LBJ enjoyed with the Great Society, that Bill Clinton enjoyed in his alliance with Newt Gingrich that gave us welfare reform and fiscal success, that Ronald Reagan had with Dan Rostenkowski and Bill Bradley to get tax reform, and so on.

If only Obama had dealt with Congress the way LBJ did—persuading, cajoling, threatening, and sweet-talking members to attain his goals—his presidency would not be on the ropes and he would be a hero. If only Obama would schmooze with lawmakers the way Bill Clinton did, he would have much greater success. If only Obama would work with Republicans and not try to steamroll them, he could be a hero and have a fiscal deal that would solve the long-term debt problem.

If only the proponents of this theory would step back and look at the realities of all these presidencies (or would read or reread the Richard Neustadt classic, Presidential Power.)

Read more. [Image: JD Hancock/Flickr]

Favorite female superhero…go.

thetallblacknerd:

tsunamistorms:

thetallblacknerd:

lorderebus:

thetallblacknerd:

impryceless:

hotbitchesanddragons:

thetallblacknerd:

Who is your favorite female superhero?

Captain Marvel although Spider-Woman is a pretty close second.

Wonder Woman and Scarlet Witch

Scarlet Witch…first I’ve seen her as someone’s list

She Hulk, Big Barda second

Both on my list

Storm, Misty Knight, Crimson Avenger (black female), and Bumblebee (only because I like her back story line)

Sensing a theme

Jenny Sparks.

Han Solo and the Art of Distraction

(Source: gwenstcy)

urgencynetwork:

Win a TRIP TO SPACE for going here and supporting a cause of your choice.

urgencynetwork:

Win a TRIP TO SPACE for going here and supporting a cause of your choice.

kissmyasajj:

jeffisageek:

joshuabanico:

Cosplay: Cobra (Wondercon 2014)

love this

HOLY SHIT

some cosplay makes you wonder when somebody is really  gonna DO what the character does - in real life. If you  can go all out and be Cobra Commander, why not BE Cobra Commander?! 

kissmyasajj:

jeffisageek:

joshuabanico:

Cosplay: Cobra (Wondercon 2014)

love this

HOLY SHIT

some cosplay makes you wonder when somebody is really  gonna DO what the character does - in real life. If you  can go all out and be Cobra Commander, why not BE Cobra Commander?! 

bobbycaputo:

Silent Storms: A Northern Lights Timelapse that Stands Out from the Crowd

Time-lapse photographer Ole C. Salomonsen specializes in the northern lights. But before you skip over this post because you’ve seen about a billion more aurora time-lapses this month, we suggest you click play and give Ole’s work a shot.

In the two years I’ve written for PetaPixel, this and Ole’s other time-lapse, Polar Spirits, are two of the most impressive northern lights videos I’ve ever seen. Beyond capturing spectacular time-lapse sequences that are expertly composed, he spices his creations up with real-time footage as well.

(Continue Reading)

rollership:

"The Sunset Mountain is a city designed by Pelli and Lumdsen in the city center, that put in the highest area and all communications coming, hosting community uses (offices, hotels, theaters …) hiperdensificados to generate all the housing system on the mountainside."

from