Daryle Lockhart


Cast
The moon Tethys casting its shadow on Saturn’s rings, April 29th, 2009.

Cast

The moon Tethys casting its shadow on Saturn’s rings, April 29th, 2009.

unknownskywalker:

Two Moons In Passing
Saturn’s moon Tethys passes in front of of its slightly larger sister Dione in this animation made from 25 raw images acquired by Cassini on March 14, 2012. Tethys and Dione are similar in diameter, being 1,062 kilometers wide and 1,123 kilometers wide, respectively. Both are heavily cratered, ice-rich worlds.
In this view, Tethys’ enormous Odysseus crater can be seen on its northern hemisphere. 400 km across, Odysseus is two-fifths the diameter of Tethys itself, suggesting that it was created early in the moon’s history when it was still partially molten — or else the impact would have shattered the moon apart entirely.
The more extensively-cratered trailing side of Dione is visible here, its signature “wispy lines“ rotated out of view. Since it makes sense that a moon’s leading face should be more heavily cratered, it’s thought that Dione has been spun around by an impact event in the distant past.
If you look closely, a slight rotation in Tethys can also be discerned from the first frame to the last.

unknownskywalker:

Two Moons In Passing

Saturn’s moon Tethys passes in front of of its slightly larger sister Dione in this animation made from 25 raw images acquired by Cassini on March 14, 2012. Tethys and Dione are similar in diameter, being 1,062 kilometers wide and 1,123 kilometers wide, respectively. Both are heavily cratered, ice-rich worlds.

In this view, Tethys’ enormous Odysseus crater can be seen on its northern hemisphere. 400 km across, Odysseus is two-fifths the diameter of Tethys itself, suggesting that it was created early in the moon’s history when it was still partially molten — or else the impact would have shattered the moon apart entirely.

The more extensively-cratered trailing side of Dione is visible here, its signature “wispy lines“ rotated out of view. Since it makes sense that a moon’s leading face should be more heavily cratered, it’s thought that Dione has been spun around by an impact event in the distant past.

If you look closely, a slight rotation in Tethys can also be discerned from the first frame to the last.

ikenbot:

Saturn’s Icy Moon Dione Has Oxygen Atmosphere
A NASA spacecraft circling Saturn has discovered a wispy oxygen atmosphere on the ringed planet’s icy moon Dione, but you wouldn’t want to live there. For one thing, you wouldn’t be able to breathe — Dione’s atmosphere is 5 trillion times less dense than the air at Earth’s surface, scientists say.
Dione’s atmosphere was detected by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which spotted an ultra-thin layer of oxygen ions so sparse that it is equivalent to conditions 300 miles (480 kilometers) above Earth. On Dione, there is one oxygen ion for every 2,550 cubic feet (90,000 cubic meters), but it’s still enough to qualify as an atmosphere, Cassini mission scientists announced Friday (March 2).
“We now know that Dione, in addition to Saturn’s rings and the moon Rhea, is a source of oxygen molecules,” Cassini team member Robert Tokar of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, who led the new study, said in a statement. “This shows that molecular oxygen is actually common in the Saturn system and reinforces that it can come from a process that doesn’t involve life.”
Dione is one of Saturn’s smaller moons and is about 698 miles (1,123 km) wide. It orbits Saturn once every 2.7 days at a distance of about 234,000 miles (377,400 km) — roughly the same as that between Earth and its moon, according to a NASA description.

"Use them together. Use them in peace."

ikenbot:

Saturn’s Icy Moon Dione Has Oxygen Atmosphere

A NASA spacecraft circling Saturn has discovered a wispy oxygen atmosphere on the ringed planet’s icy moon Dione, but you wouldn’t want to live there. For one thing, you wouldn’t be able to breathe — Dione’s atmosphere is 5 trillion times less dense than the air at Earth’s surface, scientists say.

Dione’s atmosphere was detected by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which spotted an ultra-thin layer of oxygen ions so sparse that it is equivalent to conditions 300 miles (480 kilometers) above Earth. On Dione, there is one oxygen ion for every 2,550 cubic feet (90,000 cubic meters), but it’s still enough to qualify as an atmosphere, Cassini mission scientists announced Friday (March 2).

“We now know that Dione, in addition to Saturn’s rings and the moon Rhea, is a source of oxygen molecules,” Cassini team member Robert Tokar of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, who led the new study, said in a statement. “This shows that molecular oxygen is actually common in the Saturn system and reinforces that it can come from a process that doesn’t involve life.”

Dione is one of Saturn’s smaller moons and is about 698 miles (1,123 km) wide. It orbits Saturn once every 2.7 days at a distance of about 234,000 miles (377,400 km) — roughly the same as that between Earth and its moon, according to a NASA description.

"Use them together. Use them in peace."